What is MIDI 2.0, and what does it mean for musicians and producers?

From musicradar.com:

We chat to Art+Logic’s Brett Porter to find out what makes this new interfacing spec tick.

It’s been an essential building block of how music is made for about 35 years now, but would you be surprised to learn that the MIDI standard – the protocol we use every day to play and program music on computers, synths and other electronic gear – is still at version 1.0?

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Talking about Non-Destructive Testing With Art+Logic’s Bob Bajoras

Tech Talks Daily Podcast

Bob Bajoras, President of Art+Logic, recently joined Neil Hughes on his Tech Talks Daily Podcast to discuss the relationship between software and hardware and the recent IoT truce struck between Google, Apple, and Amazon:

The recent news that Amazon, Apple, and Google are working together to create a new standard for smart home communication is a rare display of unity amongst the giants of our interconnected worlds. But will their work be successful? Is this the right time for this? Why now?

These are just a few topics that we discuss on today’s podcast. Bob Bajoras, President of Art+Logic, an innovative software development firm for over 25 years, who have worked with Google and Apple in the past, has some thoughts on the plans.

Because none of these companies have dominated the smart home field yet, Bajoras sees this plan as a truce more than a standard. Bajoras’ and Art+Logic’s extensive experience in designing for all things IoT make them thought leaders on this subject.

Introducing MIDI 2.0

From JUCE.COM:
If you’ve ever created music on a computer, it is likely that you have used the MIDI specification. Created in the early 80s as a protocol for synchronizing musical events in electronic instruments and computers, MIDI has been a staple for musicians around the world.

MIDI’s wide usage can also present various challenges – how can the protocol be improved without breaking the functionality of instruments and software utilizing the MIDI 1.0 specification, and how can a consensus be reached on the best way to improve MIDI? We spoke about these questions and more with some of the key contributors to MIDI 2.0. (Interview by Joshua Hodge)

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What Will MIDI 2.0 Mean for Musicians?

From Reverb.com:
In many ways, MIDI 1.0 has changed a lot since the specification made its public debut in 1983. You can measure the progress by how MIDI-compatible instruments connect, the types of devices and software programs that employ it, and how much easier the technology has become for musicians to use.

Connecting your MIDI controller through USB, drawing MIDI hits directly into a DAW’s drum pattern grid, or instantly mapping something like an Ableton Push to Ableton Live’s functions and parameters—such things were far outside the realm of possibility in the early ’80s.

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Q&A: Amazon, Apple, and Google to create a smart home standard

From DigitalJournal.com:
The recent news that Amazon, Apple, and Google are working together to create a new standard for smart home communication is a rare display of unity amongst the giants of our interconnected worlds. Bob Bajoras, President of Art+Logic looks into the issue.

With the discussions around a common standard some questions inevitably come to mind: Will the work be successful? Is this the right time for this? Why now? A big challenge will be with the intricacies of getting different devices, both software and hardware, to communicate to each other.

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What will MIDI 2.0 mean for you? We ask one of the people developing it

From MusicTech.com:
MIDI, the Musical Instrument Digital Interface conceived by Roland’s Ikutaro Kakehashi and Dave Smith (and others), is one of the most familiar acronyms in the studio vernacular. And, considering it’s been in commercial use since 1982, the standard has survived incredibly well.

However, there’s a new kind of MIDI in town: MIDI 2.0 and it could be about to make your life in the studio a lot easier. To explain more, we had a chat with Brett Porter, Lead Engineer at Art+Logic, the only independent developers involved in the new standard. He’s also a trained composer with a Masters in Electronic Music and has been developing MIDI systems since 1997.

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From Spreadsheets to Websites

Did you know, according to the Cisco Annual Cybersecurity Report, Microsoft Office formats (.xls, .doc, .ppt) represent 38% of malicious file extensions in email? (1) And don’t think zipping your spreadsheet file will make it any more secure because Archive files (.zip, .jar, .rar) came in at 37%.

Wait. What?!
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Making Spectrograms in JUCE

Spectrogram of swelling trumpet sound

Art+Logic’s Incubator project has made a lot of progress. In a previous post I mentioned that Dr. Scott Hawley’s technique to classify audio involved converting audio to an image and using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) to classify the audio based on this image. That image is a spectrogram. I’m going to go into some detail about what we do to create one, and why to the best of my ability.

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Art+Logic at ADC

Next week (18-20 November) I’ll be attending the annual Audio Developer Conference in London. On Tuesday November 19th at 16:00 I’ll be part of a team providing the first public details about the forthcoming MIDI 2.0 standard.

The ADC is usually live-streamed on YouTube as it happens, an unfortunate series of events have endangered that this year — you can learn more about that and consider contributing to the fund that will pay for the recording and livestreaming of conference sessions—I frequently return to the archived videos and point other developers to them for reference.

Check the JUCE YouTube channel for the streams during the event (and come back later for archived recordings, or watch sessions from earlier years).

The full schedule for the event is here.

If you’re attending the event, please do track me down and say ‘hey’.