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2014 Review: Day 4

by | Dec 23, 2014 | Developer Blog | 0 comments

As 2014 winds down, we’re taking an opportunity to look back at some of our most-read posts from this year, in case you missed them the first time. 
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Vlad Orlenko wrote a couple of great posts on integrating social logins and posting with web apps written using the Django web app framework:

 

Tutorial: Adding Facebook/Twitter/Google Authentication to a Django Application

I needed to add Facebook authentication to a Django app today, and instead of writing it directly against the Facebook API (or re-implementing the OAuth2 dance again), I decided to look around and see if there’s a pre-packaged solution for this common task. Turns out, there’s an excellent project called Python Social Auth, and it covers pretty much any social website with an authentication API.
As it often happens with amazing open-source projects, the documentation is somewhat minimalistic. One key piece that I could not find was a tutorial. This post is aiming to fill that gap. In this tutorial, we will use Facebook, Twitter and Google, as the most common social APIs, but we could easily substitute them with LinkedIn, Yahoo, Forsquare, or a bunch of other providers supported by Python Social Auth library.
 

Tutorial: Posting to Facebook from a Django App

Literally millions of man-hours are spent daily to transfer images of cat-based memes from Reddit to Facebook. This is a perfect opportunity for automation.
Let’s build an app that will allow a person who would ordinarily browse Reddit a few hours a day and repost pretty much every link from a favorite subreddit to Facebook, set a personal re-poster that will automatically forward those updates from Reddit to his Facebook wall for him, impressing his friends with his immense social presence, and saving his precious time.

 
Read the entire 2014 Review

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