Unlocking the Web Audio API

“It’s going to be the coolest thing ever.”

You know enough by now to be doubtful when a client makes this statement, but you’re willing to entertain the idea that this may not, in fact, be a tragedy in the making.

“It’s going to be a music machine – like, full keyboard and everything – but each of the keys is going to be mapped to – wait for it – cat sounds! We’ll call it the ‘Meowsic Machine’! Oh, and we need it to be accessible to everyone via the Web. Which is easy, right?

You are reminded that the universe can be a cruel place.

It’s now your job to make this happen. Over the course of a few posts, we’re going to look at the Web Audio API, and build the Meowsic Machine together. In the process, we’ll also enjoy a dalliance with Vue.js, and dip our toes into the deep-end with Web Workers. Today, we take the first step in this historic journey—convincing the browser to actually let us play sounds.

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More PWA to Ya! (Progressive Web Apps, Part 2)

Image of power lines and a cloudy, stormy landscape

Last time, we got into the nitty-gritty on how to make your web application into a Progressive Web Application (PWA to its friends). I promised we’d dig even deeper this time, and show you how to make your web app a little more ‘native’ on Android – and how to deal with iOS Safari’s special snowflake syndrome.

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More PWA to Ya! (Progressive Web Apps, Part 1)

Image of power source at sunset

It’s project kickoff time, and you’re having a conversation with your client about what form the application will take:

Client: I’m thinking mobile app. Our users will definitely be using this on the go.
Dev: Sure, we can do a native mobile-
Client: Mind you, we’ll want a desktop version too. We’ll need to use it from the office.
Dev: Okay, well, a responsive web app-
Client: One of our priorities is definitely ease of access – we’ll need the app accessible from the home screen, ’cause who has time for typing in URLs, amirite? We’ll also want it to be useable offline, whenever people want to.
Dev: Ye-yeah, no problem, we can wrap your web app in a webview, bundle it up as a native app, and-
Client: Yeah, cool. So they’ll just be able to go to the site and install the app, right?
Dev: Well, no, they’ll have to download it from the appropriate App Store.
Client: Eh, that’s a no-go – this is internal only, we can’t have it showing up in the app stores. Didn’t I make that clear from the start?
Dev: …

The term your client was looking for is Progressive Web App – an application that acts like a responsive web app when accessed from the browser on any device, but can be installed to mobile devices like a native application. The link above makes the case for PWAs, so we won’t belabour the point – if you’re still here, it’s because you’re convinced it’s time to build a PWA.

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Go Fetch 2! (JavaScript Fetch API)

Last time we discussed the Fetch API in general, taking a look at how it differed from the XMLHttpRequest API, and some of its advantages. Today, we’re going to take a look at a little library that you can include in your projects today that offers you localStorage caching for the Fetch API.

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Go Fetch! (JavaScript Fetch API)

Long ago, we briefly brushed upon the topic of what has made jQuery such a valuable part of the web developer’s toolset for such a long time – namely, a cleaner interface for interacting with the DOM, and the $.ajax abstraction over XMLHttpRequest.

These days, I would go a step farther and discuss how it has positively influenced browser APIs. jQuery offered a way to find elements using their css selectors, and this eventually gave us

document.querySelector

and

document.querySelectorAll

. More recently, browser developers have taken another page from jQuery’s playbook and introduced a new, Promise-based API for making asynchronous requests, and so much more – Fetch.

Why go Fetch? Let’s take a look.

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