Django Channels: From The Ground Up – Part 2

Man digging by Ayman Nouas from Pexels

Last time, we decided to embark on a brave new adventure and give our Django framework a big upgrade with the inclusion of Django Channels. We got just far enough to get the development server running, but while this may be an adequate start, it’s better to develop against something like what we intend to deploy, right?

So, let’s go the rest of the way and get ready to develop against something that at least resembles a standard production-ready environment with Django Channels.

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Django Channels: From The Ground Up – Part 1

Image of channels by Hans Braxmeier on Pixabay

You stare mournfully into the mass of code you’ve inherited. At some point, it’s clear, the requirements called for the server to push information to the client, because there’s an unholy mix of Server-Side Events, long-polling, hidden iframes and even a Java applet in there, all supporting some level of long-term connectivity with the server. It’s almost fascinating in its barely functional hideousness, and you would be inclined to leave well enough alone… except for the new feature specifications you’ve been assigned, which require the client to be able to send data back to the server in response to the received events, in as close to real-time as you can get.

It’s time for a major overhaul. Only Websockets can save us now. And, as it so happens, one of your favourite frameworks just added support for real-time, bi-directional communication…

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The State of Async/Await

synchronization picture

A long time ago, asynchronous programming was an exotic practice.  Not many people were doing it, and their code was punctuated with things like assembly language and processor interrupts.  Less anciently, preemptive multitasking OS’s made asynchronous programming more accessible, albeit often still with arcane and unnatural boilerplate, not to mention hazards of sharing mutable data.

Today asynchronous programming is mainstream — more than that, it’s a firm expectation of polished software for desktop, mobile, and web.  The tools for asynchronous programming have gotten better, even as far as adding syntactic sugar, which async/await certainly is.

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Payment Processing with Braintree

CC-BY licensed, via https://www.flickr.com/photos/53911972@N03/

You’ve built the web application of the century, and the users have rightly flooded to it. Cat pictures for everyone!

But alas, while your users indulge in cat-induced bliss, the cold hard reality of server costs cannot help but harsh your mellow. What is to be done?

Maybe, you could get the users to… pay for access to your incredible web application in all its multivarious splendour?

Braintree is a payment processor (now a subsidiary of PayPal), which boasts of a "simple, robust way to accept payments", and with features like a drop-in payment ui and libraries for various programming languages enabling fairly easy integration, is a solid choice for accepting payments via credit card or PayPal.

While Braintree’s developer documentation is blessedly detailed, it’s possessed of a potentially confusing bevy of options, and its various implementation examples are spread out amongst a number of pages and platforms. So today, rather than reiterate any particular section of the docs, we’re going to take a look at an end-to-end example of a specific, straightforward scenario – accepting and processing a one-time, immediately settled payment in a web application.

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Bot on the Stream

waw

You may remember my post from a while back about my experiences writing a Twitter bot. On my desktop, I keep an instance of TweetDeck running throughout the day, and one of its columns is set to view the notifications for @tmbotg. One of the bits of code in the bot is that any time another twitter user @-mentions the bot (or does an old-style "RT" retweet), the bot creates a favorite for that tweet. Recently I’ve noticed that retweets have been showing up in that column, but not getting faved. What’s up with that? (more…)