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2013: Greatest Hits

by | Jan 2, 2014 | Developer Blog | 0 comments

A quick new-year’s look back at the most-read posts here on the Art & Logic blog in 2013.

AngularJS

By far, the most popular posts here have been Vlad’s series on working with Angular.JS. Angular is clearly a framework that people are at least kicking the tires of, if not using it in anger much yet. Everyone that I’ve spoken with here at A&L who’s been using it has great things to say about working with it, once they wrap their heads around the different ways that it requires you to think about client-side development.

Marionette

Matt wrote a pair of posts on working with the Marionette application library that works with BackboneJS.

One of my favorite things about working at a shop that’s tech agnostic is that we get to explore pretty much everything that comes along that gives us an opportunity to do something cooler for a client than we’d otherwise be able to.

New UI Design Playground

Steve wrote a great post on the way that mobile weather apps have become a hotbed of UI design innovation in the way that Twitter clients were just a few years ago. A few weeks after it was posted, John Gruber mentioned it in a Daring Fireball post, and now we know that our server can survive a fireballing.

iOS & Core Data Grab-bag

We’ve gotten a lot of popular posts that have come out of things we’ve done and learned on the iOS projects we’ve been working on–thanks to Noah, Steve, and Jason:

Looking forward to 2014

Stay tuned for more from us here at Art & Logic in the months ahead–there’s plenty coming in the pipeline (and my goal for 2014 is to get one of my posts into the top 10 on this list next year…)

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