1991-2016—25 years of Art & Logic

Are Hearables the Future of IoT?

Are Hearables the Future of IoT?

Will hearables be the next big thing? One recent study by Juniper Research suggests that the market for hearables could reach $5 billion in revenue by 2020. That’s quite a leap from the current revenue of roughly $1 billion worldwide. But what are hearables? Who uses them? And why would you want to develop this kind of IoT product?

You’ve probably already heard that the next iPhone could be so slim that it might not have room for a headphone jack. Will the elimination of the headphone jack mean that iPhones will only be able to use Bluetooth headphones and earbuds? Possibly. Or maybe Apple is also working on their own type of smart earbud, and maybe that earbud will perform more functions than just transmitting sound. That’s what’s happening with hearables, at least. (more…)

Wearable Technology and the Rio Olympics

Wearable Technology and the Rio Olympics

Aside from the obvious examples, wearable tech has been all over the place at the Rio games. Olympic boxer, Tommy Duquette, for example, trained using a sensor that he helped develop. Worn on the boxer’s wraps, the sensor is designed to calculate the number of punches a fighter throws, as well as the speed, striking intensity and type of punch (jab, cross, left or right power). It uses two accelerometers and a gyroscope to capture motion tracking at a rate of 1k per second. If you’re interested in getting one of these punch trackers for yourself, you can preorder one now from Hysko.com, the company co-founded by Duquette. (more…)

The Legacy of Pokemon and the Implications of Pokemon Go

The Legacy of Pokemon and the Implications of Pokemon Go

The little pocket monsters known as Pokemon were first released in the mid-90s as a game for Nintendo’s Gameboy. Fast forward 20 years, and we’re suddenly watching the resurgence of a handheld game that was originally based on the creator’s fascination with insect collecting. The added twist, however, is that augmented reality now makes it possible to let game makers populate our reality with virtual characters that we can spot through our phones. The game has changed.

The rapid, overwhelming success of Pokemon Go! surprised even John Hanke, chief executive of Niantic, Inc., the Alphabet spinoff that co-developed the game with Nintendo. Part of his surprise was the rapidity with which the game surged as well as its immediate, and impressive impact on the company’s bottom line. But should it have been so surprising? (more…)

Federal Appeals Court Upheld Net Neutrality Rules

Federal Appeals Court Upheld Net Neutrality Rules

A federal appeals court in Washington, D.C. decided to keep the rules that require Internet providers to treat all web traffic equally. Internet  providers had been challenging the FCC’s determination that phone and cable companies should not throttle or block websites from companies that are not willing to pay extra for a virtual fast lane online.

Essentially, it means that high-speed internet should be defined as a utility rather than as a luxury and that no broadband service provider, whether fixed or mobile, should interfere with a consumer or business’ access to a fast, fair, and open internet. The FCC summarizes the rules as follows: (more…)

The 4th Industrial Revolution and the Lowercase “internet”

The 4th Industrial Revolution and the Lowercase “internet”

When will the future arrive? What will be next?

So the “internet” is now lower-case, and my spell check has already been updated to reflect that. Things move quickly when you work from the cloud, and since I use Google Docs to write and edit a lot of my work, the change might have happened well before I really took notice. As I was thinking about this decision to lower the “I” in internet (which was actually made by the Associated Press back in early April 2016), I wondered just how often the lower-case version had been used since it entered our shared lexicon. To answer that question, I turned to the Google Books Ngram Viewer, and this is what I found:

(more…)

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