May is MIDI Month!

MIDI logo

The MIDI Association has announced the plans for May Is MIDI Month 2019.

The MIDI Association, the free community for MIDI users, is launching the second annual May is MIDI Month membership and donation drive.

You can join The MIDI Association here.

May is MIDI Month is a celebration of MIDI for the entire MIDI community: companies making MIDI products, the press/media, and musicians and artists who regularly use MIDI. MIDI connects products from different companies together and also connects creative people from around the world. (more…)

Art+Logic at NAMM 2019

NAMM Show Banner

Every January, the entire pro audio and music instrument industry congregates in Anaheim, California for the Winter NAMM Show. This year it’s taking place later this week, from January 24th through Sunday the 27th at the Anaheim Convention Center.

Art+Logic will be in attendance for the 28th consecutive year, checking in with clients (old, new, and future!) and also taking a peek at new gear that’s coming down the pike.

I’ll also be speaking Saturday afternoon on a panel as part of the A3E track — “Cloud Integration Strategy: Server vs Service” will happen at 4PM Saturday January 26th in the Hilton. If you’re there, please say ‘hey’. (more…)

Developing Audio Applications With JUCE (part 1)

Audio processor graph

Audio processor graph

Several times we’ve worked on projects in the pro audio/music instrument industries that have used a very useful C++ cross-platform application framework called ‘JUCE‘. It was originally developed as part of the ‘Tracktiondigital audio workstation, and later extracted out as a standalone framework (in much the same way that Ruby on Rails was extracted from 37 Signals’ work on Basecamp). For open source projects, JUCE is licensed under the GPL, and for commercial projects it’s licensed under a very reasonable per-company license (not per-project, or per-year). Applications written using the framework can be deployed on Windows, OS X, Linux, iOS, and Android.

For audio developers, it’s an incredibly useful framework that contains solid and well-conceived classes to deal with many of the lower-level tasks that any application processing audio will need to deal with — opening and configuring multichannel audio devices (which may involve dealing with numerous different driver stacks), finding and loading audio effects plug-ins (again — several different formats exist in the wild, including VST and Apple’s AudioUnits), accepting and generating MIDI data, implementing audio effects algorithms, reading and writing audio files, and so on.

I’ve worked on a few projects that used JUCE, but was never involved in any of the work that touched that audio layer. I’ve been considering writing the next version of a long-standing personal music software system over to JUCE, and after spending some time poring over the documentation and sample code, I decided that it would be best for my sanity to start with a smaller project as a learning experience, and document what I learned as I go.
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