2014 Review: Day 7

As 2014 winds down, we’ll take an opportunity to look back at some of our most-read posts from this year, in case you missed them the first time. 

Via JMack on StackOverflow

Via JMack on StackOverflow

Christopher Keefer is back, showing a useful technique for selectively hiding option values from inside of select controls:

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Hidden Options: A Workaround

Via JMack on StackOverflow

Here’s the situation:

You’ve got a select. Maybe a whole bunch of selects, with a ton of options each (metric ton – let’s keep our imaginary hyperbolic units straight here); and these are meant to be complex interactive elements, with options made visible or not as some programmatic condition dictates.

Traditionally, if you wanted to selectively display options, you had to do it the hard way – remove the non-visible option nodes entirely. What, did you want to filter on some state information stored on the node? Too bad – you’ll have to keep track of the full structure outside of the DOM and filter on that, inserting or removing elements as needed.

This is sub-optimal. It’s much tidier if we can just set display:none on our options elements, and have them hidden like any other DOM element:

option[disabled]{
    display:none;
}

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Oh, drop downs, you cheeky little things!

Image

Why is it? Form elements are fully customizable using simple CSS styling *except* <select> drop downs. Oh sure, you can tweak colors, sizes, fonts, etc. but I’m talking about overriding the native controls and really making them your own. Of course, you can use jQuery, which is an excellent solution in most cases, but sometimes introducing additional scripts can interfere with what’s going on under the hood.

I recently stumbled upon a neat concept, and after a little wrangling, I was surprised to have found a pretty simple way to override the native <select> drop down. Oh, happy day!

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